2 Nephi 24 / Isaiah 14—the Fall of Babylon

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2 Nephi 24 / Isaiah 14—the Fall of Babylon
←Back to   2 Nephi 23 / Isaiah 13                                                                     Forward to 2 Nephi 27 / Isaiah 29  

Second Nephi 24 is the last of twelve chapters where Nephi has quoted Isaiah in a continuous string. While this chapter continues Isaiah’s prediction of the fall of Babylon, is it is closely tied to 2 Nephi 23 / Isaiah 13. After foretelling the fall of Babylon (Isa. 13:1-14:23), Isaiah moves on to the other nations of Assyria (Isa. 14:24-27) and Philistia (Isa. 14:28-32).

Fall of Babylon
After the Fall of Babylon, all these enemies of Judah also fell

[Though the Book of Mormon does not include any more chapters of Isaiah in this string, in the Bible, Isaiah goes on to prophecy the destruction of  Moab (Isa. 15-16), Damascus (Isa. 17:1-3), Israel (Isa. 17:4-14), Ethiopia (Isa. 18), Egypt (Isa. 19), Ethiopia (Isa. 20), Edom (Isa. 21:11-12), Arabia (Isa. 21:13-17), Judah (Isa. 22), and Tyre (Isa. 23)].

We must suppose that there was the purpose in Nephi’s inclusion of these words of Isaiah; why else would he painstakingly transcribe from the Brass Plates to the Gold Plates? And the question still looms, what was he trying to say to the Lamanites, “who are a remnant of the house of Israel; and also to Jew and Gentile.” a

As I look back on this part of my “discovery,” I think that Nephi quotes Isaiah to show how the troubles the Lehites had were very much like those Isaiah warned of back in Jerusalem. At the same time, Nephi quotes Isaiah to offer his people some hope, knowing full well he was offering hope to us too.  Little did his people know that his apocalyptic vision of destruction outlined in 1 Nephi 12 would mean no survivors, even after Christ’s coming to them in the Americas. Then turning to us, has his warning should move us to repent and prepare for the second coming of Christ. If not, will our fate be the same as Babylon, the Nephites, and so many Lamanites?

 THE BOOK OF THE PROPHET
ISAIAH
CHAPTER 14

Israel will be gathered and enjoy millennial rest—Lucifer was cast out of heaven for rebellion—Israel will triumph over Babylon (the world)—Compare 2 Nephi 24.

King James Version Book of Mormon
 2 Nephi 24
Expanded Notes and Commentary
 Joseph Smith Translation (JST) corrections in the Book of Mormon are in RED; links back to LDS scripture links with footnotes are in BLUE; commentary and notes are GREEN 

The Lord Will Gather the House of Israel and It Will Enjoy Peace During the Millennium*

The Lord will still have forgiveness for the Jews and restore them to Israel. The Babylonian King, like Lucifer, is fallen. Lucifer’s followers will be left empty. Assyria and Palestina will also be defeated.

aFor the Lord will have bmercy on Jacob, and will yet cchoose Israel, and set them in their own dland: and the estrangers shall be joined with them, and they shall cleave to the house of Jacob.

aFor the Lord will have mercy on Jacob, and will yet bchoose Israel, and set them in their own land; and the cstrangers shall be joined with them, and they shall cleave to the house of Jacob. The gathering of Israel in this verse logically follows the destruction of Babylon at the end of the preceding chapter. JST Isa 13:22  And the wild beasts of the islands shall cry in their desolate houses, and dragons in their pleasant palaces: and her time is near to come, and her days shall not be prolonged. For I will destroy her speedily; yea, for I will be merciful unto my people, but the wicked shall perish, and 2 Ne 23:22 create a bridge. In 539 BC, Persia defeated Babylon and allowed the Jews, who had been deported by Babylon, to return home.1
And the apeople shall take them, and bbring them to their place: and the house of Israel shall possess them in the land of the Lord for servants and handmaids: and they shall take them ccaptives, whose captives they were; and they shall drule over their oppressors. And the people shall take them and bring them to their place; yea, from far unto the ends of the earth; and they shall return to their alands of promise. And the house of Israel shall bpossess them, and the land of the Lord shall be for cservants and handmaids; and they shall take them captives unto whom they were captives; and they shall drule over their oppressors. Historically, these verses were fulfilled when Cyrus the Great of Persia issued an order allowing all captive peoples in Babylon to return to their place of origin …Jews returned in 538 B.C. and started to rebuild Jerusalem and Judea.…[and] eventually …rebuild the walls of Jerusalem, the city itself, and the temple. Later, under the Maccabees (167-70 B.C.), the Jews enjoyed autonomy and prosperity, being so successful that they began to proselyte other people in the area and to grow in numbers. Indeed, the body of Jews grew into the millions by the time of Christ; while Babylon became desolate, Judea flourishedthese verses can also find two fulfillments in the latter days. First, they may refer to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, whose missionary work spreads to all nations and prepares for the peaceful conditions under which the Savior will establish his kingdom at the time of his second coming. Second, these verses may refer to the modern-day return of the Jews to the Holy Land and their building of the modern state of Israel. However, the full blessings of these verses will not be realized until the second coming of Christ, when the Jews will accept him as their Savior.2
And it shall come to pass in the day that the Lord shall give thee rest from thy sorrow, and
from thy fear, and from the hard bondage wherein thou wast made to serve,
And it shall come to pass in that day that the Lord shall give thee arest, from thy sorrow, and from thy fear, and from the hard bondage wherein thou wast made to serve. In that day …means the day of the Lord (13:6, 9, 13) and refers to God’s judgments on the nations and Jesus’ second coming (2:12). Lord shall give thee rest from thy sorrow,…fear, and…hard bondage. Temporal rest from fear and hard bondage came to the house of Israel under the leadership of King David (David received “rest round about from all his enemies” 2 Sam. 7:1) and King Solomon (1 Kgs. 8:56), both of whom were types and shadows of the King of kings, Jesus Christ, who will give the house of Israel eternal rest. The expression of hard bondage recalls the time the Israelites spent in Egypt as slaves of the Egyptian taskmasters.3
2 Nephi 24 / Isaiah 14—the Fall of Babylon
The Ancient Near East before the Fall of Babylon

Isaiah Prophesies the Fall of Lucifer and His Kingdom

Verses 4–21 are known as the “Taunt Song” against Babylon. Pride and arrogance are personified by the ruler of Babylon, symbolizing Satan or Lucifer.4

Structured in flowing poetry, “this taunt, in the form of a lament, upon the death of a world ruler and the fall of his empire, is one of the most powerful poems not only of the Old Testament but of the whole literature of the world.” (Kaiser, Isaiah 13-39, p. 29; Isa. 14, footnote 4a.) In its historical context, the taunt song refers to the fall of the king of Babylon; in an eschatological context, it symbolizes any leader of wickedness, especially Satan:5 

King James Version Book of Mormon
 2 Nephi 2
Expanded Notes and Commentary

¶ That thou shalt take up this
aproverb against
the king of
bBabylon, and say, How hath the oppressor ceased! the cgolden city ceased!

 And it shall come to pass in that day, that thou shalt take up this proverb aagainst the king of bBabylon, and say: How hath the oppressor ceased, the golden city ceased! IE a satirical song
(see also Isaiah 13:1The historic destruction of wicked Babylon, prophesied in Isa. 13 and 14, is made typical of the ultimate destruction of the whole wicked world. D&C 133:14 (5, 7, 14)).Remembering that the term Babylon has both literal and spiritual meaning helps to clarify the awkward passages in chapters 13 and 14; as is the case with many of Isaiah’s prophecies, there are dual fulfillments hidden in his words. This creates a “tension which results from the interviewing of prophecies of a local and a universal future event.” (Kaiser, Isaiah 18-39, p. 9.): 6 

The Lord hath broken the astaff of the bwicked, and the sceptre of the rulers.

The Lord hath broken the staff of the awicked, the scepters of the rulers. The terms staff and scepter are used to symbolize the Babylonian’s authority, which the Lord will destroy. 7

He who smote
the people in wrath with aa continual stroke, he that
ruled the nations in anger, is persecuted, and
none hindereth.

aHe who smote the people in wrath with a continual stroke, he that ruled the nations in anger, is persecuted, and none hindereth. KJVaOR constant blows.
BoMaIE Babylon.
Babylon’s king was cruel and murderous; also Satan and his followers apparently do not sleep or rest, but they continuously attack and strike out at mortals with unceasing blows. that ruled the nations in anger with relentless aggression. …The king of Babylon’s (as well as Satan’s) very essence is anger, aggression, and the desire to rule (14:13–14). 8

The whole earth is at arest, and is quiet: they break forth into singing.

The whole earth is at arest, and is quiet; they break forth into bsinging.

Isaiah prophesies the fall of the king of Babylon. For Isaiah, the day was still in the distant future when Babylon would defeat the house of Israel in and around Jerusalem and carry them away captive. But, as Isaiah notes, Babylon would thereafter be conquered and destroyed by Cyrus and become part of the Persian empire (see LDS Bible Dictionary, s.v. “Assyria and Babylonia,” 615–16). The people of the earth will “rest” and “rejoice” at the spiritual fall of Babylon. 9

Yea, the afir trees rejoice at thee, and the
cedars of Lebanon, saying,
Since thou art
blaid downcno
feller is come up against us.

Yea, the fir trees rejoice at thee, and also the cedars of Lebanon, saying: Since thou art laid down no feller is come up against us. The verse recalls other scriptures in which God’s creations (the trees, forest, mountains, earth, and heavens) “break forth into singing” when the Lord redeems Jacob (44:23), comforts his people, and has mercy on the afflicted (49:13; D&C 128:22). The trees, representative of people (Judg. 9:15; Ezek. 31:8; Hosea 14:8; Zech. 11:2), now rejoice and sing because Satan has been cast down to hell. …the king of Babylon had cut down some of the trees, or murdered the people. Thus the king was seeking to become like God, who has authority to end life. We recall also that Jehovah is the great forester identified in 10:33–34, and hence the king of Babylon attempts to imitate God’s ability to cut down nations and peoples. Yet, as J. Alec Motyer observes, “With exact justice the arrogant woodsman [the king of Babylon] has ‘had the chop!’”12 Satan, similarly, attempts to make people suffer the second death.10 

aHell from beneath is moved for thee to meet thee at thy coming: it stirreth up the bdead for thee, even all the chief ones of the earth; it hath raised up from their thrones all the kings of the nations.

 aHell from beneath is moved for thee to meet thee at thy coming; it stirreth up the bdead for thee, even all the chief ones of the earth; it hath raised up from their thrones all the kings of the nations.

In vv. 9–11, the scene moves from the earth to the spirits of the dead in the underworld (she’ol).11

The word hell in this verse may refer to the place of departed spirits; in particular, spirit prison where the wicked spirits dwell. “The inhabitants (prisoners) of hell are stirred or excited about the arrival of this once-powerful person”  12

 10 All they shall speak and say unto thee, Art thou also become weak as we? art thou become like unto us?  10 All they shall speak and say unto thee: Art thou also become weak as we? Art thou become like unto us? As the king of Babylon enters the abode of the wicked in the spirit world, he is greeted by other once-powerful leaders (“chief ones”) in mortality. They are amazed that he has become as weak and powerless as they are and they note that his once-influential voice is no longer listened to.13
11 Thy pomp is
brought down to
the grave, and the
noise of thy viols: the worm is spread under thee, and the worms cover thee.
 11 Thy pomp is brought down to the grave; the noise of thy viols is not heard; the worm is spread under thee, and the worms cover thee.

See NRSV translation. The king of Babylon is subject to the putrefying decay of death.14 

Isaiah delivered a bitter taunt against the king of Babylon and his universal counterpart Satan, the ultimate king of Babylon, who at the end of the world would be cast into spirit prison with all the other fallen wicked souls (2 Ne. 24: 3– 23) while the Lord’s people would enjoy millennial rest (2 Ne. 24: 1– 3, 7).15 


Isaiah Compares the Fall of the King of Babylon to Lucifer’s Fall from Heaven

King James Version
Book of Mormon
 2 Nephi 2
 Expanded Notes and Commentary
12 How art thou fallen from
heaven, O cLucifer, son of the morning! how art thou cut down to the ground, which didst weaken the nations!
12 How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! Art thou cut down to the ground, which did weaken the nations!  cHEB morning star, son of dawn. The ruler of the wicked world (Babylon) is spoken of as Lucifer, the ruler of all wickedness. TG Devil.
Lucifer is the king of Babylon and the arch-rebel who typifies all other rebels. A son of the morning, he aspired to ascend above the stars of God and be like the Most High (Isa. 14:13-14D&C 76:25-27). With pride and arrogance, he promised to do what God himself would not do—save all men—and thus laid claim to God’s glory (D&C 29:36-37Moses 4:1-4). Thus God’s heavenly arch-rival became the type or model for all earthly rivals. When Babylon, the wicked world, presumes to fight against God, it follows Satan’s model and becomes the antithesis of everything God represents.16
13 For thou hast
said in thine heart,
I will ascend into
heaven, I will exalt
my throne above the stars of God: I will sit also upon
the mount of the congregation, in the sides of the north:
13 For thou hast said in thy heart: I will ascend into heaven, I will exalt my throne above the stars of God; I will sit also upon the mount of the congregation, in the sides of the north; In verses 13–14, Isaiah explains to us Lucifer’s motives that led to his rebellion:
13 For thou hast said in thine heart [these were your motives], I will ascend into heaven, I will exalt my throne above the stars of God [I will be the highest]: I will sit also upon the mount of the congregation, in the sides of the north [mythical mountain in the north where gods assemble]: 17
14 I will ascend above the heights
of the clouds; I will be like the amost
High.
14 aI will ascend above the heights of the clouds; I will be like the Most High. 14 I will ascend above the heights of the clouds; I will be like the most High [as described in Moses 4:1–3].17
Here Isaiah gives us an echo from the premortal existence by comparing the conquered king of Babylon to the fallen “son of the morning” (see 2 Nephi 24:12, footnote a, and Isaiah 14:12, footnote c).18
“I will be like the most High.” Ambition is pride’s first cousin. Lucifer aspired to ascend to heaven, to have a throne higher than the stars of God, to be like God—all of which was ambitious indeed. It appears that he felt he could displace God. His selfish ambition ruined his eternal existence. Jesus said, “whosoever shall exalt himself shall be abased” (Matthew 23:12) and “that which is now exalted of itself shall be laid low of power” (D&C 49:10). The higher up we are, the farther we can fall; Lucifer apparently fell from a very high position. He is described as “an angel of God who was in authority in the presence of God” (D&C 76:25).19
15 Yet thou shalt
be brought down to ahell, to the
sides of the pit
15 Yet thou shalt be brought down to hell, to the sides of the apit. Likening the fall of the king of Babylon to that of Lucifer evokes images of his arrogance, but it also shows how futile his work will be when it all fails: “Thou shalt be brought down to hell, to the sides of the pit” 20
16 They that see thee shall
narrowly look
upon thee
, and consider thee, saying,
Is this the man
that made the
earth to tremble, that did shake kingdoms;
16 They that see thee shall narrowly look upon thee, and shall consider thee, and shall say: Is this the man that made the earth to tremble, that did shake kingdoms? When all the children of God see Lucifer as he is consigned to his ultimate fate, they will squint at him with disgust and amazement and wonder aloud: Is this the person who caused such incredible physical and spiritual devastation in the world? this spiteful, pathetic figure of misery and degradation? 21
17 That made the world as a wilderness, and destroyed the cities thereof; that opened not the house of his prisoners? 17 And made the world as a wilderness, and destroyed the cities thereof, and opened not the house of his prisoners? Other translations render this verse, “would not let his captives go home” (Holy Bible, New International Version). Similarly, Satan does not want to let us go once we are bound by his “awful chains” (2 Nephi 1:13). The Savior is the only one who holds the key that can unlock us from spiritual bondage. 22 
18 All the kings of the nations, even all of them, lie in glory, every one in his own house. 18 All the kings of the nations, yea, all of them, lie in glory, every one of them in his own house. The free gifts of salvation and resurrection are given to all mortals; even the most wicked kings on earth will still “lie in glory, every one in his own house” (or “degree of eternal glory”; see KJV, v. 18). But Lucifer will have no tomb[…he has no body]. 23
19 But thou art cast out of thy grave like an abominable branch, and as the raiment of those that are slain, thrust through with a sword, that go down to the stones of the pit; as a carcase trodden under feet. 19 But thou art cast out of thy grave like an abominable branch, and the remnant of those that are slain, thrust through with a sword, that go down to the stones of the pit; as a carcass trodden under feet. Satan will not receive any glory, however, but will be cast into outer darkness. This doctrine is enlarged upon in Doctrine and Covenants 88:21-35 (see also D&C 77:8; 133:73). 24 
20 Thou shalt not be ajoined with
them in burial,
because thou hast destroyed thy land, and slain
thy people: the bseed of
cevildoers shall
never be renowned.
20 Thou shalt not be joined with them in burial, because thou hast destroyed thy land and slain thy people; the aseed of bevil-doers shall never be renowned. [Satan] will be thrown into a pit (of outer darkness) without any posterity. 25
21 aPrepare
slaughter for his children for the iniquity of their fathers; that they
do not rise, nor possess the land,
nor fill the face of the world with cities.
21 Prepare slaughter for his children for the iniquities of their fathers, that they do not rise, nor possess the land, nor fill the face of the world with cities. The children of evildoers will perish because they heeded their wicked fathers’ sayings. that they do not rise, nor possess the land, nor fill the face of the world with cities. The righteous will possess the lands of promise (14:1–2) and build cities of Zion for the pure in heart. The wicked, however, will not be blessed to inherit such cities of Zion. 26

The Physical Destruction of, or Fall of  Babylon (14:22-23)

22 For I will rise up against them, saith the Lord of hosts, and acut off from Babylon the name, and remnant, and son, and nephew, saith the Lord. 22 For I will rise up against them, saith the Lord of Hosts, and cut off from Babylon the aname, and remnant, and son, and bnephew, saith the Lord. The term cut off is the same as excommunication (Ex. 12:15, 19). Hence, those in Babylon who are cut off will be excommunicated from God and his saints, and they will not have any part of God’s covenants. The reference to son and nephew here indicates that the line of inheritance will be cut off to make room for the new King Messiah to reign. 27
23 I will also make
it a possession for the abittern, and pools of water:
and I will sweep it with the bbesom
of destruction, saith the Lord of hosts.
23 I will also make it a apossession for the bittern, and pools of water; and I will sweep it with the besom of destruction, saith the Lord of Hosts.

The lowly “bittern” (a large marsh bird of the heron family—Byetheway states that bittern has also been translated as “owl,” “hedgehog,” and “porcupine.”) would typify the future life form of this once-proud land. When Cyrus conquered Babylon, he destroyed her irrigation works, turning the once lush and fruitful land into fetid pools of water (swamps or bogs). 28

A besom is a broom made of twigs tied around a stick


God Controls the Destiny of Nations


The Fall of Assyria (24–27)

24 ¶ The Lord of hosts hath sworn, saying, Surely as
I have thought, so shall it come to
pass; and as I
have purposed,
so shall it stand:
24 The Lord of Hosts hath sworn, saying: Surely as I have thought, so shall it come to pass; and as I have purposed, so shall it stand— The previous verses applied also to the evil empire Babylon. Now the scene changes back to her infamous predecessor. In the year 701 b.c., Assyria attacked Judah and succumbed to catastrophe at the hand of the Lord himself (Isaiah 36–37). Isaiah’s vision of historical events is like the panoramic vision of John the Revelator in that both move back and forth through periods without too much concern for strict chronology29
25 That aI will
break the Assyrian
in my land, and upon bmy mountains tread
him under foot:
then shall his yoke depart from off them, and his burden depart from off their shoulders.
25 That I will bring the Assyrian in my land, and upon my mountains tread him under foot; then shall his ayoke depart from off them, and his burden depart from off their shoulders. Verse 25 in the Book of Mormon (2 Nephi 24) is rendered “I will bring the Assyrian in my land” instead of “break the Assyrian,” as in the KJV. The Assyrian represents the Gentiles, and the purpose of the Lord is to give all the gentile nations an opportunity to be numbered with Israel (see 3 Nephi 30:1-2). The judgments of God will be poured out upon those who reject this opportunity. 30
26 This is the purpose that is purposed upon
the whole aearth: and this is the
hand that is stretched out upon ball the nations.
26 This is the purpose that is purposed upon the whole earth; and this is the hand that is stretched out upon all nations. This is the Lord’s decision and it will certainly come to pass …Assyria wanted to conquer all nations (10:14), but the Lord’s purposes are greater. He is in control of all nations and has power over all the earth. 31
27 For the Lord
of hosts hath
purposed, and
who shall disannul it? and
his hand is
stretched out, and who shall turn it back?
27 For the Lord of Hosts hath purposed, and who shall disannul? And his hand is stretched out, and who shall turn it back? Nothing the Lord proclaims shall be disannulled (be completely annulled or come to naught) by any means; neither man, nature, nor the forces of the adversary shall stay His hand or make void His words. Said the Lord to the Prophet Joseph, “Behold, I, the Lord, declare unto you, and my words are sure and shall not fail.” (D&C 64:31.) 32

The fall of Philistia (28-32)

Fall of Babylon
Kingdoms that would also fall after the Fall of Babylon; Philistia is shown in red

The country of Philistia [or Palestina] consisted essentially of five city-states, each governed by its own lord. The nation was home of the Philistines, detested enemies of Judah and the Israelites. This country was at the height of its power at the time of King Saul’s death, but declined during the reign of King David. The Philistines were conquered by the Assyrians in 734 b.c., later they became part of the Persian Empire, and finally the land was annexed to Syria by the Romans. “Strangely enough the name of the territory of these detested enemies of the Jews has become one familiar title (Palestine) for the whole of the Holy Land.” (LDS Bible Dictionary, “Philistines,” 751.) ” 33

28 In the year that king Ahaz died was this burden. 28 In the year that king Ahaz died was this burden. Another “burden” (prophecy of doom) is now pronounced. This time the victim is yet another enemy of Judah—Palestina, or Philistia. Sidney Sperry noted that “although the prophecy is more especially directed against Philistia, Judah is also involved. Unfortunately,” he then adds, “a number of thorny, unresolved historical problems prevent the giving of a reasonably exact interpretation of some parts of the prophecy. But Isaiah seems to be telling Philistia not to rejoice over his predictions of the ruin and downfall of Judah, her traditional.” 34
29 ¶ Rejoice not thou, whole
Palestina, because the rod of him that smote thee is broken: for out of the serpent’s root shall come forth a cockatrice, and his fruit shall be a fiery flying serpent.
29 Rejoice not thou, whole Palestina, because the rod of him that smote thee is broken; for out of the serpent’s root shall come forth a cockatrice, and his fruit shall be a fiery flying serpent.

Palestina was also known as Philistia and was conquered by the Assyrians along with Israel in about 722 B.C. See the map on p. 120. A cockatrice is a poisonous snake (see LDS Bible Dictionary, s.v. “Cockatrice,” 647). ” 35

One “snake” is dead—Shalmaneser—and a worse one will yet come—Sennacherib, King of Assyria, 705–687 B.C. The Philistines rejoiced when Sargon, King of Assyria from 722–705 B.C. took over at Shalmaneser’s death. Sargon was not as hard on them as his predecessor was …his son, Senacherib shall be a fiery flying serpent.36

30 And the firstborn of the poor shall feed, and the needy shall lie down in safety: and I will kill thy root with famine, and he shall slay thy remnant. 30 And the firstborn of the poor shall feed, and the needy shall lie down in safety; and I will kill thy root with famine, and he shall slay thy remnant.

The Lord describes the two options that are before the Philistines at this point:37 

Those who are humble and who suffer (the poor and needy) will join Zion, which was founded by Jehovah (14:32). The New International Version suggests that the first-born of the poor are the poorest of the poor
God will create a famine in Philistia, or Palestine, that will destroy its remaining inhabitants after the wars with Assyria have ended. The root may refer to the Philistines who are yet producing children, those who are about to bring forth another generation.38

31 Howl, O gate; cry, O city; thou, whole Palestina,
art dissolved: for there shall come from the north a smoke, and none shall be alone in his appointed times.
31 Howl, O gate; cry, O city; thou, whole Palestina, art dissolved; for there shall come from the north a smoke, and none shall be alone in his appointed times. Isaiah speaks prophetically of the future, as if it had already happened. 39
(Monte Nyman suggests we compare Doctrine and Covenants 97:21)
The gate, and the city which it represents, will howl and cry and ultimately be dissolved by a power coming down from the north, Assyria and then Babylon. 40
32 What shall one then answer the messengers of the anation? That the Lord hath founded Zion, and the poor of his people shall trust in it. 32 What shall then answer the messengers of the bnations? That the Lord hath founded Zion, and the poor of his people shall trust in it.

a In the NIV, it reads, “What answer shall be given to the envoys of that nation?”
b The Book of Mormon change to the plural “nations” matches the Dead Sea Scrolls change to the plural “kings.” 41
In the midst of the destruction of nations, the Lord will take care of His faithful poor and needy in Zion. Zion is where the Lord’s people dwell with “one heart and one mind” having “no poor among them” (Moses 7:18).42

This final note of commentary from Joesph Spencer:

It wouldn’t be difficult to guess where Nephi might go with things if he wanted to extend his plain prophecy to provide an application of Isaiah 13–14.…as applicable to the final judgment. You’ll remember that those two chapters tell a prophetic story about Babylon’s total demise, and Isaiah there has all sorts of people making fun of Babylon’s king as he dies, a king whose nickname in the King James Version is “Lucifer.” Wouldn’t Nephi have rather easily seen Isaiah 13–14 as continuing the story, then? After Israel’s restoration, there’s one last bit of the world’s history to recount, namely the final eradication of evil and the punishment of the devil. Couldn’t Isaiah’s taunt song regarding Babylon’s fallen king be applied pretty readily to the final binding of Satan? Nephi’s certainly seen such an event in vision. He tells us about it in 1 Nephi 22, making it precisely the sequel to Israel’s redemption.43 


Footnotes

(* Headings are taken from The Book of Mormon for Latter-day Saint Families, by Thomas R. Valletta, Deseret Book)
Book of Mormon, Title Page
Madsen and Hopkin, Opening Isaiah: A Harmony, p. 59
Victor Ludlow, Isaiah Prophet, Seer and Poet, Deseret Book, p 186
3 Donald W.Parry, Understanding Isaiah, Deseret Book Company. Kindle Edition.
4 Madsen and Hopkin, ibid.
Victor Ludlow, ibid.
Victor Ludlow, ibid.
Thomas Valletta, The Book of Mormon for Latter-day Saint Families, Deseret Book. p 126
Parry, ibid.
Valletta, ibid.
10 Parry, ibid.
11Madsen and Hopkin, ibid.
12 Hoyt Brewster, Isaiah Plain & Simple, Deseret Book, p 139
13 Brewster, ibid.
14 Madsen and Hopkin, ibid.
15 Dennis L Largey,  The Book of Mormon Reference CompanionDeseret Book Company. Kindle Edition
16 
Robert Millet and Kent Jackson,  Studies in Scripture, 8-in1 e-Book Bundle, Deseret Book Company.
17 David J. Ridges, The Old Testament Made Easier Part 3, Cedar Fort, Inc.. Kindle Edition
18 John Bytheway, Isaiah For Airheads Deseret Book Company, Kindle Edition.
19 Kelly Ogden, Verse by Verse, Old Testament: Volume Two, Deseret Book Company. Kindle Edition.
20 Millet and Kent Jackson, ibid
21 Ogden, ibid.
22 Bytheway, ibid
23 Ludlow, ibid
24 Monte S.Nyman, Great are the Words of Isaiah, Cedar Fort, Inc.. Kindle Edition.
25 Ludlow, ibid
26 Parry, ibid.
27Parry, ibid.
28 Brewster, ibid.
29 Ogden, ibid.
30 Nyman, ibid.
31 Parry, ibid.
32 Parry, ibid.
33 Brewster, ibid.
34 Brewster, ibid.
35 Valletta, ibid.
36 David Ridges,  The Book of Mormon Made Easier Part 1, p. 292, Cedar Fort, Inc. Kindle Edition.
37 Ridges, The Old Testament Made Easier
38 Parry, ibid.
39 Ridges, The Old Testament Made Easier
40 Ogden, ibid.
41 Madsen and Hopkin, ibid.
42 Valletta, ibid.
43Joseph M. Spencer, The Vision of All: Twenty-five Lectures on Isaiah in Nephi’s Record, Greg Kofford Books.


Chapter Links to the Book of Isaiah
(those in blue are posted others are pending)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33
34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44
45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55
56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66

 

Chapters of Isaiah Quoted in the Book of Mormon

1 Nephi 20 21
2 Nephi  7  8  12  13 14 15  16  17
18 19 20 21 23 23  24  27
Mosiah  14
3 Nephi  20  22

 

Other Isaiah passages quoted in the Book of Mormon

1 Nephi 22:15–17
2 Ne 6:6–7
2 Ne 6:16-18
2 Ne 8:24-25
2 Ne 9:50-51
2 Ne 30:9
2 Ne 30:11-15
Mosiah 12:21-24
Mosiah 15:29-31
3 Ne 16:18-20
(does not exist in the King James Version)
Isa 49:23
Isa 49:24-26
Isa 52:1-2
Isa 55:1-2
Isa 11:4
Isa 11:5-9
Isa 52:7-10
Isa 52:8-10
Isa 52:8-10

 

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I am a retiree from Scouting. There I blogged for VoiceOfScouting.org, a site with more than 250,000 readers. During 42 years in the workplace, I've had many years senior level management with the BSA, professional associations, and high tech user groups. My background includes capital fundraising; outdoor adventure program development; property and construction management; event/conference planning; risk management and safety; lobbying federal, state and local government agencies; public relations; strategic planning; member advocacy and staff/volunteer training. Along the way, I have also taught Gospel Doctrine Classes and been both the ward and stake Sunday School President. In these settings, I have seen teachers and class members minimize Isaiah, a book Christ has commanded us to "search diligently." (3 Ne 23:1) With that in mind, I will do my best to explore and post my discoveries about the book of Isaiah. I am not a Bible scholar; like you, I read Isaiah in the Old Testament cycle of study in LDS Gospel Doctrine Classes and again in the Book of Mormon Cycle, so this is a whole new scripture adventure for me.

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